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Supergroups tend to be more for the members involved than the fans; whether it’s an experiment in a genre untested by those musicians or, like in this case, a cathartic release of frustrations there is always the sense that you’re watching a little bit of ego stroking and there’s always more pressure on a supergroup’s album thanks to the names involved.

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What do you do when an album’s title reviews the record better than you ever could? D-Beat Machine is succinct, with a full description of the sounds within, while the band name Dis-Tank sounds like an adjective for the nature of this assault: “Mate that album rolled over you like a Dis-Tank!”

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Give some screamo bands six minutes and they’ll attack you in a frenzy, like a crime of passion that culminates in multiple stab wounds and tears; give We Never Learned to Live and Human Future six minutes each and they’ll take their time, methodically punishing you with one aural bludgeoning each.

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Of all the genres available to discerning ears pop punk may be one of the purest; from the bastardisation of several styles emerged something chock full of hooks, sing along lyrics and relatable themes. Originality is never expected, though always appreciated; you listen to pop punk for the entertainment.

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Somos fall into that all too common group of bands who are entertaining enough but glide right past you, never really leaving any sort of mark. Temple of Plenty might as well be their genre let alone an album title. Accessibly average indie-emo which only really uses an individual voice at the close of Distorted Vision where they break into some sound manipulation.

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Have you ever scoured your record collection and thought “well gee, everything just sounds so clean and straight up and gosh darn it I really am sick of it”?  Well Two Knights could very well be the remedy you’re looking for. Comprised of two (surprise) guys they drag their brand of emo across twinkly bits, awkward crashes of distortion and shouting, throw in some off beats and long winded song titles then push the result at you in their own awkwardly unique way.

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Sinai Vessel’s self-deprecating description of themselves, ‘sissy punk’, may draw a few laughs but this E.P., filled with sombre reflection and stripped back musicianship, is anything but weak. Indeed there’s an irony to the fact that this E.P., about examining our own misconceptions, could come from a band so misconceived.

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If most screamo bands seem to be cramming the maximum amount into the shortest space of time than We Never Learned to Live turn this idea on its head, attacking the listener with as much vitriol as their peers but allowing the songs to grow, organically, to the eight or nine minute mark giving them breathing room for the expansion of their melodies.

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There was nothing direct about its creation yet the second Owls record is upfront from the offset; starting with a bluesy, catchy guitar riff and moving across ten tracks of pure indie that encapsulates everything great about the musicians behind this.

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Seahaven have moved themselves forward from Ghost; Reverie Lagoon: Music for Escapism Only is more thoughtful, incorporating a wider array of influences – check out the beautiful nod to Jeff Buckley’s version of Hallelujah during On the Floor – and creating album that is anything but escapist, wholly designed to pull you into a story.

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