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We have a chat with writer and director Deborah Haywood to find out what goes on behind her films.

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Enjoyment Records seem to hold a monopoly on awesome splits at the moments; this Foureign Friends split showcasing four quality indie/emo bands starting with Lions. Their track Time Spent Spending Time Apart starts with a great, hooky melody with those tuneful vocals before morphing into something closer to Fall of Troy, incorporating some dazzlingly mathy time signatures while keeping the track unfeasibly catchy.

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There’s always a sense of guilt when you give an album a bad review (spoiler alert) especially when the band in question play in a style you’ve supported and enjoyed. When the record should be everything you want and yet you feel absolutely nothing. The fact is that Atlas at Last are not a bad band but this release struck zero chords with me and will be, I’m sure, forgotten almost instantly.

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Each song on this E.P. starts ‘A’. Each song reduced to a noun and an adjective, deceiving the listener in regards to the complex battery within. Where plenty of post-hardcore bands are guilty of using whole sentences – even paragraphs – to name their tracks this Australian sextet let their music do the talking. Even their name, Regresser, implies something simpler than their sound.

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If the first Kibou compilation featured bands all walking a similar path than Vol. 2 offers up some more variety. Kicking off with the unstoppable Dis-Tank and their track Culture War, things drop a notch with Albion. Their track Black Charcoal Lungs shows off an impressive list of influences but never captures the energy or ferocity of any of them.

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Revenge of the Psychotronic Man sure know how to kick start a compilation; Red Top Bullshit slots in the nicely with the High Fidelity mixtape rules by opening strong. From the starting riff it’s a furiously fast assault that sounds like a coked up Motorhead racing Zeke on a one mile straight.

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It’s hard to overstate the importance of Blink 182 on the pop punk world. Their lyrical combination of the emotional and the light hearted has influenced bands all over the world and their music perfectly set them up for a jump to the mainstream without sacrificing too much of their personality.

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There are plenty of bands trying for a punk sound without realising that it really is an attitude, no matter how clichéd that sounds. Casual Nausea could rock up with ukuleles and kazoos and still hammer home this point; these sixteen tracks have that feel of rebellion about them, sitting comfortably alongside the like Crass and Subhumans.

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Planets Live in Houses are ambitious with their sounds. Sucking you in with a twinkly, instrumental rendition of your favourite indie bands and then gradually turning up the math rock, adding in the peaks and the troughs; over the course of Wolf Computer, the opening song, they’ve already done so much and still build to a glorious hard rock finish that culminates in a wave of fuzzed out guitar work.

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Supergroups tend to be more for the members involved than the fans; whether it’s an experiment in a genre untested by those musicians or, like in this case, a cathartic release of frustrations there is always the sense that you’re watching a little bit of ego stroking and there’s always more pressure on a supergroup’s album thanks to the names involved.

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